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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 113 (some duplicates have been removed)
already cancelling flights. even talk about shutting down the new york transit. hurricane irene wasn't that bad. i'm not going to worry this time, sam. >> dan, we were right over here. the thing about hurricane irene, we got to remember, it was a very bad storm, it brought a lot of rain and a lot of flooding to inland areas. it didn't do the coastal damage. all of the problems that you could have with this system, coastal damage is just one, then you have rain, wind and then flooding. in this case, you have snow as well. you got those five points. maybe one point wasn't as bad in irene in the biggest part of new york. but i'll tell you in the biggest population center of new york, but that was a bad storm for a lot of folks. be prepared for this storm to have a stronger coastal effects. it may be more wind and more rain if these forecasters are right this morning. our ginger zee is right now in atlantic city, where they're getting ready for that. i remember that coastline, it barely ramps out from the water to where those casinos are, good morning. >> i have lost everything. i have n
through like katrina or like irene? >> every storm is different, as i said. we have their own hazards. irene was a storm that moved parallel to the coast with most of the heaviest weather to the right so there were a lot of folks very close to the center in new jersey, for example, that didn't really know that there was a lot going on. this storm instead, first of all, it's much larger than irene. it's coming directly at the coast instead of parallelling it. the effects are spanning hundreds and hundreds of miles, much more so than irene. >> ifill: this storm is hovering with lots of rain centered over one area. how many days do you expect we'll be coping with the fallout from all of that? >> well, i think that it's going to take until wednesday before conditions really significantly improve so that people can get back and start looking at what happened. tomorrow it's still going to be a bad day because the system is going to slow down once it gets towards pennsylvania. it will weaken, but it's going to take a long time for this system to wind down. >> ifill: james franklin of the nat
year with irene. we thought it was going to be such a big event for new york and it was a dud. it wasn't a big dud for vermont, new hampshire, new jersey, because of the flooding. but this is what we have to work through right now. this storm that looks like that, like just literally nothing, still a small category 1 hurricane, but can this morph literally into something that will have 80 to 90 mile per hour winds, put 20 inches of rain down, and cause millions of people to be without power for days and probably some for weeks. can it happen? yes. all the forecasts say that it will happen. but you know what, all the forecasts said that irene would be a worse storm than it was and it's not. everyone i'm talking to believes that this storm will be significantly more impact for new york, new jersey, maybe pennsylvania than irene was. >> it's going to be a tropical storm, right, by the time it gets up, by the time it actually hits the eastern seaboard? >> no, it will be a tropical storm briefly in here. here's the model guidance for you. the models are all right there. we put them into mot
. during irene it was 4.4. we expect to double what we had in irene. that's the problem. that's what kicked in yesterday and that's why the mandatory evacuation order was kicked in. the storm is deep in low pressure, and we expect the wind field to push this water up through long island sound and just to give you an example. you can see what's going on here in terms of how high water is. it's below the sea wall, but it's probably going to be about a good third of the way up this pole. that brings it all the way back into the battery and probably into lower parts of manhattan as well. parts of wall street will probably flood, so we anticipate this water to be much higher. the only difference in it could be the fact that it's going to come up gradually as opposed to quick like with the storm surge. not gradual in like 20 minutes but maybe over an hour or so we see that water coming up and coming up. we see the tunnels here shut down. the brooklyn tunnels now shout done, the holland tunnel is closing at 2:00 this afternoon. that's an order from the governor. when you see things like that occur
, when hurricane irene came through and the flooding that i've seen down to my left here, going out underneath the boardwalk, out on the streets where all the homes are on long beach is already much, much worse than irene. further left, because of the conditions here and the camera angle, you can't see it. but there is a lifeguard station that last year 14 months ago in irene was swept off its foundation. it's done it again. the authorities have been appealing to people all day to get out. get out of long beach a get across the bridge. >> bret: stay safe. we will head further south and correspondent steve harrigan is in ocean city, maryland. good evening, steve. >> good evening, bret. hurricane force winds here cracking over the seawall. 15 to 20-foot waves. part of the pier has been destroyed by the waves. the governor making a forceful statement saying stay in your house. this storm is going to kill people. we want to limit the loss of life. stay in the house. as many as 30,000 people now without power. as the conditions are likely to continue to get worse throughout the night. br
. >> reporter: sandy could create a storm surge larger than last year's hurricane irene. possibly filling the subway tunnels with water. >> lower manhattan is the most vulnerable spot for a storm surge. >> no doubt about they expect this to be a large problem for central new jersey, including philadelphia, atlantic city, new york city all of the way up toward boston. something that we need to pay attenti attention to. >>> now, potentially new york city, where hurricane irene last year wasn't so bad in the city itself, what would you say to people who are tempted to write this off? >> i want to remind folks about that hurricane, it was a bad storm, dan, it just didn't deliver the wind damage that new york city expected and the surge wasn't really here. but if you look inland where it was catastrophic flooding and so many folks were acted that storm. it was a terrible storm. this storm hurricane center said that it will have all of those elements focused on these big population areas, and new york city is one of them. i'm going to ask everyone to be prepared. >> all right, better safe than
including this one. so only twice before irene being one of them. here's why. the storm is still 24 to 36 hours away. the flow starting to flow up over that and you see this barrier, it could easily with a 10 to 20-foot rise wave up and there's the iconic boardwalk some being boarded up so taking it very seriously not only here in atlantic city but through the barrier islands up the jersey shore. and that's who it's going to hit. right to those graphics. i need to show you who will get what and when. that storm surge very important. i want to show you exactly what to expect here. 6 to 9 feet in that red area or 4 to 8 feet, excuse me, in that magenta area and then the blue still, you've got a 1 to 3-foot surge and all coming from the southeast end to the northwest. let me show you the wind forecast, because sam showed you how big and how many people will be involved in this. but look at how high those wind speeds go, 60 to 80 miles per hour, pittsburgh, d.c., new york city and boston in that red zone, and, of course, it extends all the way back to the eastern great lakes too. we'll watch
after hurricane irene which left people without power in that state for days. martha. martha: we'll find out what lessons were learned from irene at the same time as this last year. so many places out of power for so many days. we'll see whether or not we're in better shape this time around. airports across the northeast have been brought to a virtual stand still. that is causing a ripple effect for travelers around the country. airports across the new york city area are open. but carriers canceled 7600 flights. basically you're not going anywhere in and out of this area today and down to d.c. as well in many cases. some airlines added flights out of the northeast. so they can move their planes off the ground and out of the storm's path to other areas around the country. all of this adds to the travel nightmare and indeed amtrak as well is suspending their train service across the region. so folks, where you are is where you're going to sty for the time-being. the storm is shutting down the new york stock exchange. the last time that happened was almost 30 years ago. during hurricane glo
unprecedented proportions. to put things in perspective. hurricane irene which you can see her on the right caused nearly $16 billion in damage and take a look at sandy in comparison. with sandy expected to linger over the northeast for days one can only imagine if the difference in size will reflect the difference in damage. we'll have the latest on the storm track and its strength in one minute. rick? >> reporter: the winds have picked up even more from last hour. steady now in the 40s and 50s with gusts but feel like over 0 miles per hour. i can't even read the wind gauge or turn into the rain because rain and sand is pelting us it many pretty painful. we are just after low tide. so the surf i'll it's rough is not encroaching on the boardwalk at this point and ocean avenue is still relatively dry. but other roads in the community are under water and many other roads across the state of new jersey are hazardous. the garden state parkway has been closed from exit 63 south to cape may. that's a major highway in new jersey shut down because of flooding in both directions. in fact atlantic ci
here. also when you think back to what happened with irene, there was concern about flooding on the sound side here of the outer banks, so, you know, this area is prone to flooding. that's something that everyone's keeping a close eye on. also the winds out here are picking up. they've been right around ten to 25 miles per hour off and on. the rain off and on. but the situation out here will deteriorate as the day goes on. this area remains under a flash flood watch and a tropical storm warning. so people are taking stock of that. they're getting supplies. a lot of peel pl-- people planng to ride this storm out. we talked about some of the people who hadn't boarded up their windows. it turns out there's a mix of people there. are some people who have homes here who don't live here, so those homes have not been boarded up. some people who plan to ride the storm up. that's what we're seeing here. some who have left the area. because when you think back to what happened with irene, irene was more of a direct hit. people saw a lot of damage in this area. this time they're expecti
: well, we should look at irene. this will cause at least as much problem as irene. i expect this to get their act right back together and do not be viced if this is a category two or category three by sunday before it turned to the northwest. it is very warm water in the atlantic. very warm. we back in the 1950s. we had ten major hurricanes on the east coast including hazel in 1954 in mid-october which had a path similar to this but it was to the west. that want into north carolina and you notice this storm is attacking from the southeast, right? and basically, it is that path superimposed to the east so hazel led to wind gusts at 100. >>neil: what makes it a mess for the northeast, combining with the other areas? >>guest: what makes it, (a), it moves slow and intensifies miling water to the northeast beaches. that is first. >>neil: and it sits? >>guest: full moon and look at the way the coast is shaped. it is shaped so you funnel water into new york city and push the storm surge in. the normal hurricane like irene comes along the coast and heads for long island and we get flooding alon
's hurricane irene. >> you saw in irene, we didn't move a lot of people out of the seniors homes and hospitals and if necessary, we are prepared to do the same thing. >> reporter: hurricane sandy has already ripped through jamaica and cuba and now it is in the bahamas. heavy rain and strong winds damaging many homes, knocking down power lines and uprooting trees. the cuban government says more than 50,000 people evacuated before the storm made landfall. sandy also forcing officials to postpone terror-related hearings at guantanamo bay. although no deaths have been reported in could you be arc the storm did kill at least four people elsewhere in the caribbean. phil keating, fox news. >>> a prim county jury find a former fbi agent guilty on all charged for killing a tamer while driving drunk. ed a ray and johnson cashed into lawrence garner's vehicle killing him and seriously injuring his friend. >>> president obama fresh off a busy couple of days crisscrossing swing states is back at the white house today. the president is staying in town aat the present timing a national democratic committee m
nervous. >> you think it's going to be bad? >> i think so. >> i'm worried. we lucked out with irene, and i don't know. this may be worse. >> nbc's tom strong traung is l rehoboth beach, delaware. any residents left? >> they have about eight hours, the governor issues a mandatory evacuation area. everybody must be out by 8:00. look down the beach, have you several dozen people trying to get their last glimpse. right now, low tide. looks pretty impressive. come high tide, around 6:30, it wouldn't be a surprise if we didn't see water coming up to this fence here. all around rehoboth beach, a lot of businesses boarded up. people making runs to the grocery store, water short, bread is short. people did what they could in terms of preparation. they had about eight hours, around that time, this area will be shut down. cut off the bridges and roads into here it won't be a very pleasant place to stay if the electricity is going to go out. which is a likelihood. 2,000 utility workers and we're talking about the maryland/dc area, baltimore areas, and states of emergencies in those areas as well. a lo
. >> larry, people are comparing this storm to last year's hurricane irene the tenth costliest in history. now from its command center today, home depot sending sump pumps, shop vacs anticipating lining irene a lot of coastal and inland flooding. for home depot that means demand for carpeting picks up after the storm. if there's any extra profit for the retail that comes out of this storm it comes from demand not pricing. home depot locked in prices this morning just to make sure that consumers will not get gouged. as for paying for the property, property and casualty insurers in good shape thanks to higher premiums and a lack of major events. a major storm may allow some of them to pass on higher prices to their clients. restaurants will see business decline. restaurants like this group you see here can take solace from the fact the storm is hitting did your the slow part of their week. as for the power provider the big exposure these four have in the mid-atlantic region where the heaviest rains and flooded is forecast. any earnings risk lies in prolonged outages in those areas. farther
, and the like. just to give you some perspective, last year, during irene, large sections of roads were washed away here in north carolina. power was knocked out to about half a million people, and seven people died. so, even -- and that was a low-end storm. i wouldn't really read in to much to the fact that this is a tropical storm or a low-end hurricane. either way the effects are going to be devastating and now is the time when people really do need to prepare, alex. >> i'm glad you're putting that reminder out there. it's absolutely true. just because it says tropical storm right now, don't let your guard down. julie martin, thanks for watching things for us from north carolina. we're going to check back in with dylan dreyer at the bottom of the hour for the very latest on the path of the storm. al roker will also be coming our way from delaware. >>> back to politics now. today republican presidential nominee mitt romney heads for florida to campaign with senator marco rubio. governor romney and vice presidential candidate paul ryan had a big rally in ohio, and today congressman ryan is on
back there is a storm fence put up. as i understand it, when hurricane irene hit, it came about that far, maybe a little further out. and with a lot of people at first were hesitant to evacuate because they said irene wasn't that bad. most of the damage of flooding was inland and not here on the coast. as you can see, the coast is just washed away. it's completely gone. as i said, it extends perhaps about 100 yards outs in na direction. the same situation from the north and cape may in the south, down near at alantic city towards the tip of new jersey and the garden state parkway the main highway into that area, which bisects of entire state, has been closed off because they don't want people to go back into that area. it's completely vevacuated, and right now somewhere from here to there is where the storm is expected to hit. we're going to take cover when we have to. we're in a position that's somewhat prekd prekted. it's enough protected we feel safe enough. again, things are deteriorating very quickly by the hour. >> all right. >> reporter: back to you guys. >> thank you, ro
lessons from the last storm. >> reporter: connecticut is one of 13 states haunted by last year's irene, and the nearly 16 billion in damage, leaving thousands without power for days. then hit by a surprising snowstorm on halloween. today, governor malloy warned it could be the type of storm not seen in 30 years. >> have enough food and water for everyone in your household. assume there will be an elongated period of time in which you will be without energy. >> reporter: at the massachusetts store? power supplies were hot items. >> i have generators, make sure we have oil, flash lights, got to be prepared. >> reporter: storm surge is another worry, with a full moon, sunday night being a difficult combination, it sent the area in norfolk, virginia, out to sea. others sought safe harbor. and along the new jersey shore, these people sought safe harbor >> i may as well take the right steps, get the boat out of the way. whatever is going to happen will happen >> reporter: this boat yard couldn't keep up with requests. >> no, i'm sorry, we can't take boats out of the water. >> reporter: they'
? >> well, charlie, it's a major disaster in new jersey. and, you know i've gone through irene, the october snow storm, the blizzard in 2010. this is, by far, the worst thing we've gone through. we have 2.4 million people or households, rather without power, over 200 state roads closed. it wasn't actually a levee. it was a berm and the berm was overwhelmed by the tidal surge that came up the raritan bay. we are in the process of rescue rescuing people from moonachie, in middlesex county rescuing people from their homes not from river flooding but tidal surge from the bays. not even to mention what's happened on the jersey coastline, which i think in the long run will be the part of the state that's the most devastate ed ed. you saw the scenes yesterday from up and down our coast. new jersey, obviously, this is where it came onshore. i think the state of new jersey took it in the neck worse than any other state. it's going to take us a while to dig out from under it but we will dig out from under it. >> many people waking up now to all the damage. can you calculate how mu
island instead of bussing people off the island as they did last year during irene. and that's why we have a situation. let's walk over here and show you what the rest o of atlantic city is dealing with. this is an access ramp that takes you up to the boardwalk. so these are the streets of atlantic city down here. this is what it looks like. several feet of water covering the street. and here's where things became a problem. you have 400 people on the other side of the city who decided to ride out the storm and stay in their homes and as we talked earlier today, flood water was coming into those homes and there was no way for local emergency crews to get to them. so they had to mobilize national guard units to get those people out of their homes. things got so dangerous they had to pull the personnel back. so there were a couple hundred people still in their homes on the bay side of the city. the governor said it's a situation they will have to monitor and first thing in the morning at first light respond to and try to get those people out. not far from here just a couple blocks, one
is that we kind of had those same warnings for irene. i don't want people to go, oh, they just say that all the time just to get our attention. but, no, there is potential for some dire stuff going on here. and we're talking about power down -- power lines down, trees down, all kinds of other things. finally the computers are agreeing. and you can see a couple doing loops. if this thing does a loop right over new york or new jersey or pennsylvania, that means 24 to 36 hours of rain coming down an inch in an hour. do the math. that's a couple feet of potential water. here we go. the potential impacts, i think the coastal infland flooding the biggest. obviously we saw that in vermont from irene. the waves will be larger than 30 feet battering long island, new rhode island all the way to massachusetts and new jersey depending on where it lands. coastal erosion. we could lose homes as the beach gets washed away and power outages could be in the millions taking literally maybe a week to get all those power lines back up. and that could be far enough that it could affect the election. wolf. >> br
with these types of storms. we had your cain irene last year with over a million customers without power. rachel came through this summer knocked out the same amount without power. we've been through this before. our local officials have been through this before. they're well-trained. they have good plans how to respond to this. we've been communicating and people are taking steps to be prepared. so we feel fairly confident in virginia folks are taking the steps to be ready for whatever the storm might bring. jon: i know you have got the national guard out and ready did. you've got power crews coming in from other states to help restore power as well, don't you?. >> yeah. we know many of our power companies in virginia are prepositioning out-of-state resources coming in. national guard we deployed them in key areas around the commonwealth to be ready to deploy and help out local officials that might need assistance. we have our state police and out there. department of transportation. they have their crews across the commonwealth. they're already to go to help out as needed. jon: from virginia's
evacuations in the past 14 months. the problem is 14 months ago turn hurricane irene, that just perhapses, it does not do the damage everybody predicted. a lot of people that evacuated suffered more with the evacuation centers than those who stayed behind. everybody was worried that people would say, that's the lesson they learned, they're going to stay behind this time. we see a lot of people sticking around. couple of bars are open, they're having hurricane parties. everything isn't so bad right now, but the partyings going to be turning a lot of danger real soon if everybody sticks around tonight. there's no way in or out now. the main highways into this town are now shut down. and police are now using emergency vehicles, four wheel drives, they can't use police cars to get around. and a lot of these veteran officers are telling me if they drive around they're seeing streets flooded they've never seen, even big puddles on and this again, long before the worst of this stuff hits here in new jersey. tony, allison. >> steve, that is extraordinary. as you said, great concern because the wo
hurricane irene, we achieved a 98% evacuation rate. but for whatever reason, this time, we haven't reached that number yet. we think we're somewhere having evacuated several thousand people. but we still have too many people in atlantic city. that creates a very uncomfortable situation for all of our emergency responders and officials are still trying to do the best we can to get people out of harm's way. >> mayor, ali velshi is on the streets of atlantic city. right now, the winds are obviously very gusty. ali, you have a question you'd like to ask the mayor. >> reporter: yes, i do, mayor. and the important thing is by looking at atlantic city, people can look at this and say, this might happen in my community. if you're still not evacuated, what do you do? i know people are driving around. they can get out in their car but it's gusty and dangerous. should people leave and go to a shelter now or hunker down and stay? >> at this point, i think they would be best served to stay at home and hunker down. i just visited a couple of our shelters. i had a very difficult time getting back to wher
irene hit this area a lot of people evacuated. the coast wasn't hit that hard. the bigger problem was inland. that's why [ inaudible ] behind this time but for the most -- staying behind last time but for now people are pushing out because of the danger, the high winds are obvious. we're in a very protected position, by the way, and we're going to move back if things get worse. but again, we're charting it by the hour every hour and for now, things here are under control, but again it's getting to be a very dangerous situation down here. andrea? >> i was going to ask you that exact question, ron. so you and your crew, you know what to do. but the people who are -- and this is repeating the president's appeal, what chris christie has said, mike bloomberg, the appeal to people who are refusing to evacuate because they are putting first responders in danger and as i'm looking at the pictures of you, ron, the shape of that beach along the jersey shore is never going to be the same. this is going to have to be restored in some way because the enormous erosion already is being washed aw
's preventing anything from turning back out to sea. even irene moved up along the coast and parallel but scooted on .n out. that central atlantic block is probably going to force the iorm westward. the cold pool over the eastern united states, that's the winter storm you were referring to you. , thaake all the tropical energy, all the heat from the tropics, you combine it with winter cold, that's an explosive ingredient in the atmosphere and that's why we think this storm has so much potential. i encourage everybody to pay attention to what their local emergency management personnel tell them. >> pelley: the last major hurricane to hit the u.s. this late in the season, was wilma, sven years ago today. maat was a category three storm. it killed five people in florida that and caused more than $20 billion in damage. it's the third costliest hurricane in the u.s. after andrew and katrina. we are down to the last 12 days of campaign 2012. that mpoll out tonight suggests that mitt romney has closedly the gender gap. last month, president obama led poig women by 16 points, but rew, they're
combining the destructive power of hurricane irene, which did $14 billion in damage last year, with the punishing nor'easter of 2009 that brought catastrophic flooding. and then, add in a freezing cold winter temperature, all in one storm. >> this storm is going to be destructive, historic and unfortunately, life-threatening. >> reporter: another fear, the extreme coastal surge that's expected. anywhere from 4 to 10 feet. areas like washington, d.c. are already vulnerable to flooding, and because of the full moon monday, which means higher than normal tides, places like atlantic city could see a swamping ten-foot storm surge. that's also possible for new jersey and new york, where evacuation orders may be enforced in coastal areas. even new york city's subways are at risk of flooding. mayor bloomberg says they may be closed as sandy approaches. for more on the damage sandy is already doing, we go up the florida coast to my extreme weather team colleague ginger zee. ginger? >> reporter: sam, cocoa beach is known as one of the widest beaches in the state of florida, but not toni
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 113 (some duplicates have been removed)